News & Press Releases

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2015

January

Charitable organizations in Apache Junction, Queen Creek and San Tan Valley share their needs to continue helping communities in the new year

2014

December

Pan de Vida Foundation sets up Christmas Angel Trees at local businesses

November

Calais Campbell Named NFLPA Community MVP
Pan de Vida awarded $6,000 thanks to Peter Gloria and the 3 sacks that Campbell made against Seattle.

April

Pan De Vida Foundation Awarded ‘Signs of Hope’ Grant

2013

September

QC’s top business peopleOut n’ About with Mary Gloria

August

PAN DE VIDA FOUNDATION, HEALTH, SOCIAL & COMMUNITY FAIR PLANNED FOR OCT. 12

May

PAN DE VIDA FOUNDATION CELEBRATES RIBBON CUTTING WITH GREATER SAN TAN CHAMBER

NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER AT QUEEN CREEK TOWN HALL

SADDLE UP RANCH PARTNERS WITH PAN DE VIDA FOR UNFORGETTABLE DAY OF FUN

February

STUDENTS JOIN PAN DE VIDA COMMUNITY CLEANUP EFFORT

2012

August

Pan De Vida Celebrates Students’ Commitment to Service Pan De Vida Celebrates Nine Years of Helping the Community

2011

November

Pan de Vida aims to provide healthcare to needy families

July

Pan de Vida celebrates eighth anniversary

May

A New Look For Little Mexico

2010

December

100 Families with gifts & food for 284 children – Thanks to Pan De Vida

November

Adopt-a-Christmas Child Program, November 23, 2010Pan de Vida provides 100 families a Thanksgiving Meal, November 22, 2010

October

October 27, 2010 – Volunteers Needed
Pan De Vida, a local, non-profit service organization, is seeking adult volunteers to work with homebound elderly and disabled individuals in the Queen Creek area. Volunteers are needed to make friendly calls, visit, socialize, provide technical assistance, provide transportation, shop, write letters and more. Volunteers are asked to commit six months of service. Training is required and will be provided.Pan De Vida is working with area faith-based congregations to provide free services. To volunteer, make a referral or request services, call 480-987-0819 or e-mail PANDEVIDA@peoplepc.com. Please leave your name and daytime telephone number when you call.Donations needed for senior programs: Pan de Vida Foundation is in need of “White Elephants” i.e. gently used decorations, household items, unopened household cleaners, toiletries, paper products, can food, discount coupons, or gift certificates, etc. These items will be used as prizes for the Queen Creek Senior Citizens weekly Bingo games. (A monetary donation, perhaps in a loved one’s memory, could also provide financially stressed seniors with these products.) We are also getting more and more calls from Senior Citizens who need transportation to medical appointments. If we can get ten (10) more people to volunteer two hours a week, we can provide for the needs of these folks. Please call 480-987-0819 for more information, and to volunteer or donate. Pan de Vida Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. A receipt will be provided for your donation.Arts and craft supplies are needed for the Queen Creek Senior Citizen’s Program. Donations of things such as paints, beads, flowers, craft books, etc. are needed. These items will be used by the Senior Citizen’s Compañeros (Companions) program. Donations may be dropped off on Thursday mornings at the Queen Creek Community Center, or you may call for pick up at the number listed below. Please call Mary Gloria at 480-987-0819 to donate, or for pick up. Pan de Vida Foundation is a local non-profit 501 (c3) organization. A tax deductible receipt will be provided for all donations. For information on the Senior Citizen’s Compañeros (Companions) program, or to join our volunteer program, please call Mary Gloria at 480-987-0819.Spring Cleaning? As you clean out your home, shop or garage, please remember, Pan de Vida Foundation is a local non-profit that will take all your gently used items and give you a tax deductible receipt. Please call Mary Gloria at 480-987-0819 to donate.

October 13, 2010 – ‘Little Mexico’ unites behind clean-up cause
By Zach Richter, Today Publications, The Sun Valley Estates neighborhood, affectionately known in the area as “Little Mexico” sits on the eastern edge of San Tan Valley amidst heaps of debris and dust from the unpaved roads. Devoid of streetlights, the area is a target for vandals and the streets aren’t safe after dark. Supervisor Martyn and Dr. Fuller explain that change will come to the area only through a sustained group effort.However, things are looking up for this resilient neighborhood. The Pan de Vida Foundation is organizing a Neighborhood Enhancement Project for Saturday, Oct.16, 2010 and community and county leaders organized an event to raise awareness for the cleanup that took place Oct. 2.The awareness event, titled “Bridging Communities,” featured free food, free dental examinations and music from the XS Band of Phoenix. The goal was an open discussion with County leaders about the needs of the neighborhood and to encourage participation and conversation about these issues. Greg Stanley, Public Works Manager for Pinal County, also announced the County’s plan for a drainage project to combat the areas flooding issues.District 2 Supervisor Bryan Martyn and Florence Unified School District Assistant Superintendent Dr. Amy Fuller were both on hand to motivate the community and assure them that change is coming. Supervisor Martyn explained that, while the county can help, much of the positive change would have to start those who live in the area. “This idea came from community members’ right here, trying to make this a place you are happy to call home,” he said.Dr. Fuller echoed his sentiment and called for community members to unite under this positive cause. “We need to take responsibility for our future, because no success can compensate for failures in the home,” she explained.In what amounts to a major first step for the area, Public Works Manager for Pinal County Greg Stanley, announced at the event that the County has plans to implement a drainage project for the area. According to Stanley, the first phase of the project will begin next summer and will create a retention basin, pave roads and put in gutters. The county will also be starting drainage improvements on Skyline Drive.The event served as a way to get the community fired up about the Neighborhood Enhancement Project that will take place on Saturday, Oct. 16, from 6:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.According to Maria Gloria, founder of the Pan de Vida Foundation there has been an extreme outpouring of community support for the project. There are lots of people interested, I’m so excited,” she remarked.Currently Senator Rebecca Rios and District Supervisor Bryan Martyn have both promised to attend, as will members of several local church and volunteer groups. The event will also feature A Mercy Care Clinic Hospice, volunteer raffles and a performance by San Tan Foothills High School Principal Ben Rodriguez’s band.Gloria invites all interested parties and groups to join in the effort to create a safe haven for the children and families of Sun Valley Estates, while promoting self-sufficiency and pride of their homes, and community. “We are asking people to come and help,” she said. “This is about more than just the area; we want to give the people a new beginning.”For more information contact Mary Gloria, President and Founder of Pan de Vida at 480-987-0819 or emailmary.gloria@pandevida.tvThis e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view itor check out PanDeVidaAz.org.

September

September 13, 2010 – Pan de Vida organizes cleanup of ‘Little Mexico’
By Zach Richter Today PublicationsOn the eastern edge of San Tan Valley, the Sun Valley Estates neighborhood languishes amidst waste accumulated from years of construction and residential dumping. Thanks to subpar construction, many of the houses flood when it rains and the runoff turns some areas to cesspools.Due to its myriad of problems, the homes in the area are extremely cheap; as a result, they have attracted a large migrant population. When Mary Gloria, President of the Pan de Vida Foundation, saw the neighborhood and heard people were swimming in the water/waste runoff she knew her organization had to take action to help the area affectionately known as “Little Mexico.” “This is just an extension of what we do,” she said. “Lots of help is needed there.”Gloria started the Pan de Vida Foundation in 2003 to provide services that promote self-sufficiency, education and equality to those in need. “Pan de Vida was created in response to a need in the community,” she explained. Since its inception, the foundation has expanded into numerous projects including food distribution, holiday assistance programs and even college scholarships for local girls who are active in their community.The idea for the Sun Valley Estates neighborhood cleanup began three years ago when Gloria was helping a woman who was living in her car in the area. “I wanted to start the cleanup then, but I didn’t have the assistance I needed,” she lamented.In 2009, she was delivering food boxes in the area when she learned that people were swimming in the runoff and began putting the event together.” I knew I had to do something,” she recalled.To that end, the Pan de Vida Foundation is organizing a Neighborhood Enhancement Project on Saturday, October 16, 2010, from 6:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Gloria went on to say that so far, there has been an extreme outpouring of community support for the project. There are lots of people interested, I’m so excited,” she remarked.Currently Senator Rebecca Rios and District Supervisor Bryan Martyn have both promised to attend, as will members of several local church and volunteer groups. The event will also feature A Mercy Care Clinic Hospice, volunteer raffles and a performance by San Tan Foothills High School Principal Ben Rodriguez’s band.Gloria invites all interested parties and groups to join Pan de Vida Foundation in the effort to create a safe haven for the children and families of Sun Valley Estates, while promoting self-sufficiency and pride of their homes, and community. “We are asking people to come and help,” she said. “This is about more than just the area; we want to give the people a new beginning.”For more information contact Mary Gloria, President and Founder of Pan de Vida at 480-987-0819 or emailmary.gloria@pandevida.tvThis e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view itor check out PanDeVidaAz.org.

June

Shoe Drive Sponsored by Queen Creek Women In Business to benefit Pan de Vida Foundation.

May

The Town of Queen Creek Chamber of Commerce Will Donate Proceeds of Golf Tournament to Pan de Vida Foundation.
Pan de Vida Foundation Mission Statement:To promote self-sufficiency, education, health and the development of families and individuals in need. Pan de Vida Foundation is a 501 C 3, grass roots, non-profit Organization operating in the Maricopa and Pinal Counties. Pan de Vida provides program for the youth, seniors, families, and low income folks of this area. Pan de Vida has provided 500 young boys in Queen Creek with football jerseys and bags to hold their gear.Coupons 4 Kids: Pan de Vida is sending high school senior graduates to college. YOU CAN HELP; Purchase the products with the attached Pan de Vida “Cents Off” coupon at Bashas Grocery Store, Power Rd and Chandler Heights. Or you can drop off your donated coupons at the Queen Creek Library, Local Banks and Restaurants.The Pan de Vida Food Bank provides nourishing food to family and individuals in need. The Clothing bank provides families with gently used clothes to low income families. The Foundation’s President and Founder, Mary Gloria, has devoted her life to community service. She was honored for her work with Pan de Vida as a 2005 recipient of the prestigious Hon Kachina Award. Mary has also been honored with a 2005 Ak-Chin Award, and as the 2003 Town of Queen Creek Woman Volunteer of the Year. Others awards Include 2005 Nominee “Queen Creek Woman of the Year Awards”, 2004 Cardinals Community Quarterback Finalist award, and 2008 Valle de Sol, HLI Alumni Excellence Award.

2009

Founder Selected Beth McDonald Woman of the Year

September

September 24, 2009
Bashas’ store manager, Henry Samaniego, Jr at the Chandler Heights and Power Rd location in Gilbert presented Pan de Vida Foundation with its first check for $817.40. This represents monies collected from the manufacturers coupons. Volunteers attach manufacturers coupons marked with the Pan de Vida logo to store products at the Bashas’ store. When the customer buys the product with the coupon attached the cashier takes the coupon off the product and sets it aside for “Coupons 4 Kids, program. No money comes out of the customer’s pocket or the Bashas’ store. The coupons are tallied and sent to the Manufacturer of the coupon for redemption. The money comes to Pan de Vida “Coupons 4 Kids” program through Bashas’.The checks will be set aside to pay for college tuition and books for area graduating high school students.Pan de Vida thanks all the volunteers that are helping this program become successful.Footnote: This program has been successfully working in Lake Havasu City, since 1992 and has received over $650,000.00 from manufacturer’s coupons and has helped over 7,000 families that needed just a “Hand up” Accepting the check from Bashas’ Happy Howe, Volunteer Coordinator, “Coupons 4 Kids” Mary Gloria, Founder, Pan de Vida Foundation. Henry Samaniego, Jr. Bashas’ store manager and Bill Shanley, Treasurer, Pan de Vida Foundation.

June 3, 2009

Managing Editor – East Valley
Apache Junction/Gold Canyon, Mesa and Queen Creek Independent newspapers
By Terrance Thornton, Independent Newspapers As the economy continues to squeeze down on employees, employers and municipalities, East Valley outreach organizations are beginning to feel the pinch, but that isn’t stopping them from continuing to move forward. When people lose their homes, find themselves out of work and unable to provide for their children’s needs or turn to drugs and booze to cope with life’s pressures, outreach organizations are often called on for help, officials say. While cities and towns in the East Valley look at ways to trim next fiscal year’s budget, health and human services funding may be left on the cutting room floor, officials say.The town of Queen Creek provides funding for non-departmental or nonprofit organizations and the majority of those dollars are spent on the Queen Creek Chamber of Commerce, Boys & Girls Club of the East Valley, the Queen Creek Child Crisis Center, community events and the Queen Creek Performing Arts Center. However, this coming fiscal year it is anticipated — Queen Creek Town Council will have the final say on the matter — for the town to increase its funding to the Boys & Girls Club of the East Valley, a town official said.”Because they are not only providing for the after-school programs,” explained Dee Anne Thomas, the town’s information and marketing services department director, in a phone interview. “They are expanding their programing.” With $81,250 in funding from the town, the Boys & Girls Club of the East Valley is expecting to increase its current teen program, according to proposed recommendations from the Queen Creek Budget Committee. Queen Creek Councilman Gordon Mortensen, who is on the Queen Creek Budget Committee, says the town is looking at ways to maintain support to outreach organizations even during tough economic times. “Certainly, we want them in our community and stay as solid as they can,” he said in a phone interview. “We try to get them all sound; you work hard to get them in the community … it is the human element.” Keeping those organizations within the community may be made possible in the immediate future with in-kind donations, Councilman Mortensen said. “Money is about 15 percent reduced across the board,” he explained of budget cuts, noting the potential increase this coming fiscal year to the Boys & Girls Club for the development of a new program. “We felt there was reason to increase their funding.”But Councilman Mortenson says outreach organizations are a staple of any strong community. “We are still a startup community, but you want to keep the human aspect intact,” he said. Mary Gloria, Pan de Vida Foundation Board of Directors president, agrees. “We just do a little bit of everything that we see in the community,” she said in a phone interview. “Mainly, where we see there is a need we go.” The Pan de Vida Foundation, which is an all-volunteer organization helping citizens in need of the Queen Creek and greater San Tan Area, is eyeing a vacant town building in the downtown area to serve as a headquarters for the outreach group, Ms. Gloria says. According to Ms. Gloria, the building is directly across the street from Serranos Mexican Restaurant, 22703 S. Ellsworth Road. The agreement would be an in-kind donation and Ms. Gloria says she has been meeting with town officials on the matter, but must submit an application for use of the facility before the operation can be considered, which she has not — yet.The Pan De Vida Foundation, which has been in existence for five years, has provided three community college scholarships and is sponsoring three ASU students, is beginning a new coupon program to boost revenue. “We have not been a part of that, we have applied, but we have not got any funding from them,” Ms. Gloria explained of town of Queen Creek funding. “We have submitted allocations; yes, we have not exactly gotten to the point we would like to.”Despite the lack of town funding, Ms. Gloria says the outreach effort remains steadfast to its goal, which is to aid the community at-large. “We are just seeing what is needed in the community,” she said. “Right now we are seeing a need for people who need help paying their utility (bills) because of the economy.” Bill Shanley, Pan de Vida Foundation board of directors vice president, says since the organization’s inception it has sought to fill the need members of the group have become aware of.”We are a nonprofit that has helped the community for the past five years. That is what we do, we give back to the community,” he explained while helping out at the Pan De Vida display announcing the “cents-off” endeavor at the Queen Creek Bashas’ Supermarket, 23760 S. Power Road.Happy Howe, Pan de Vida Foundation coupon volunteer coordinator, explained the “cents off” program as a fundraising effort where manufactured coupons are used in Bashas’ stores in Queen Creek and once redeemed, Pan de Vida receives the savings garnered.”It comes from the manufacturer, so your money is not coming out of your pocket,” she explained as shoppers passed by. “It is a big community fundraiser.”To contact the Pan de Vida Foundation call 480-987-0819.

March

Queen Creek clothing sale to benefit needy
Mar. 12, 2009 08:22 AM
The Arizona Republic – The Pan de Vida Foundation will hold a used clothing sale on at 7 a.m. March 28, at Mountain View Family Church, 4815 W. Hunt Highway, Queen Creek. All proceeds will benefit Pan de Vida’s programs and work in the community including the food bank, medical clinic and Scholarship program. Pan de Vida is a nonprofit organization serving needy families in Queen Creek and surrounding areas. Pan de Vida Foundation leaders say they have received more calls for assistance this year than ever before. WHO BENEFITS
Pan de Vida’s founder, Mary Gloria, says “The main purpose of this benefit sale is to raise funds in order to help families who are in desperate need. “WHAT’S AVAILABLE
“We have priced the clothes very low in order to benefit the families whom purchase them. Children’s clothing will sell for 10 cents each, men and women’s shirts two for $1 and pants and shoes will sell for $1 each.” Gloria said. DONATIONS NEEDED
“We are accepting donations of clean, gently used items, especially boys clothing. We are also in great need of canned and other non-perishable food items for our food bank,” Gloria added. LEARN MORE AND HELP
Volunteers and donations of clean, gently used furniture, household items and clothing are welcome. To learn more, visit PandeVida or call 480-987-0819.Read more: Article

February

Pinal, QC shoe drive nearing an end
Feb. 12, 2009 10:10 AM
The RepublicTime is running out for people to donate new shoes for needy children in Queen Creek and Pinal County.The Warm Shoes for Cold Feet drive benefiting the Pan de Vida Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping the indigent in Pinal and Maricopa counties, ends Saturday.The drive organizers, including Queen Creek Women in Business, hope to collect 100 pairs of new or nearly new children’s shoes.Shoes can be deposited at one of three drop boxes located inside the Queen Creek Library, at MI Bank at Ellsworth and Ocotillo roads, or at the Keller Williams Realty office at 2500 S Power, No. 121.Donors who want a receipt for their tax deductible donation can contact Realtor Karen S. Berg at 480-545-7662. For tax or estate planning questions contact Brown and Jensen for more info. Read more: Article

2008

May

Queen Creek food assistance programs struggling
May 17, 2008
Sarah J. Boggan, Tribune
TOUGH TIMES:Mary Gloria operates Pan de Vida, a nonprofit group that distributes food for needy families, from her home near Queen Creek. There are slim pickings in the cupboards of the Queen Creek area’s food assistance programs, as donations struggle to keep pace with an increase in people seeking help. United Way seeks to replenish United Food Bank – A new class of needy emerges in Gilbert “We’re seeing that there’s a lot more need,” said Mary Gloria, who runs the nonprofit group Pan de Vida out of her home near Queen Creek. “We’re seeing much more need from people who are without jobs, from people who are deciding whether they should buy food or make their mortgage payment.” Her organization used to provide emergency food boxes to 100 families each week. Now, as the economy continues to struggle, each week they’re providing about 400 food boxes, she said. “We don’t turn anyone away,” she said. Gloria said the nonprofit food pantry, which serves the Queen Creek and Johnson Ranch areas, is also seeing fewer donations to meet the skyrocketing needs. The food boxes provide a week’s worth of groceries to a typical household, including dairy and meat products, fruit, vegetables and other staples.Epic Christian Church’s food mission, based in Johnson Ranch, is facing similar issues said Phoenix DUI attorney. Food mission leader Cameo Rooney said donations are drying up, and the church now is reaching outside of the community for help. The mission usually relies on school canned food drives.”We’ve been open for a year now, and we have seen a huge decrease in the amount of donations that we’ve been getting,” Rooney said. “We’re getting food, but it’s not filling our shelves.” Rooney said the mission started out providing about 10 food boxes every other week, and now they are feeding more than 60 families each time they distribute food.
“The biggest thing I’ve seen is how many new people there are,” she said. “They’re not people you look at and say ‘they’re in need.’ It’s my next-door neighbor, it’s my best friend.”Gloria said she has seen increased requests for diapers and gas money, even though her group does not provide cash. She called the problem “heartbreaking.” Gloria is relying on supermarkets and donors to help fill the gap.
“We keep looking for help,” she said. “We keep trying to find people that will help us and try to do something because they are concerned about the needs of the community.”Nonprofit organizations across the state are worried about the possible impact of reduced state and federal funding, as well as lower turnouts for fundraisers, said Patrick McWhortor, president and CEO of the Alliance of Arizona  Nonprofits. “Everybody is clearly worried,” McWhortor said. “The concern about the economy is having some ramifications.” There isn’t any data about the economy’s effects on nonprofits, and effects are speculative, he said. “But those organizations (that rely on state funding) go out and look at other sources,” he said. “The competition for the other sources becomes that much more of a crowded field.”Despite the tough environment, McWhortor said giving is still evident. “While people might cut back in their spending somewhat, they are still very generous in their giving,” he said. “We’re trying not to paint it as doom and gloom, but there is definitely concern across the sector.”

2006

October

Women’s Health Expo 2006

January

Queen Creek May Lose It’s Last Low-Income Housing

2005

November

Angel in the morning feeds the homeless

September

Service is a way of life for honorees

July

Home of homeless to vanish

Kachina Volunteer Award Recipient

June

Volunteer makes her mark

April

Mary Gloria wins Hon Kachina

Day Labor Issue in Queen Creek